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Yakkin’ ‘Bout Mappin’

November 15, 2012

Last week, we made an election map that shows how counties voted in relationship to several different demographic variables. It gave us a chance to take value-by-alpha (VBA) mapping one step further than we did after the 2008 election. Back then, we produced a nice little static map. Our new, interactive map is a bit more substantial, having a user interface, loading data, including a charting component, and displaying a data probe with details on mouseover.

Unlike our typical interactive mapping project, this one was rather small in scope. We wanted to make something that could come together quickly and easily and be seen before people stopped caring about the election. There was also no client, so we were free to work however we pleased in order to get done fast. In other words, no one was telling us that we had to make this work in IE7! All said and done, we devoted twenty-eight hours to the map before sharing it on Twitter.

Because the project was short and received a sustained, concentrated effort from each of us, a behind-the-scenes look at its development seems like it might be of interest to other mapmakers. If nothing else, it serves as an example of how three people, working in different parts of the world, interact together online to get work done. Something for the human geographers out there, at least, if not for the cartographers.

What follows is our Campfire transcript covering the duration of the project. Outside of this transcript, there was no video, voice or other written communication between us. The language here has been smoothed out and edited somewhat in order to reduce each thought, question, or decision to its essence, although there are some direct quotations thrown into the mix.

We think about every project, large or small, slow or fast, client or not, in terms of three primary components: data, design, and code. They are essential ingredients of web cartography and what any aspiring cartographer should learn. To that end, the transcript below has been tagged with colored dots that represent the predominant component in play at any given moment in time, plus a yellow dot for instances when our thoughts were mostly on project planning or management issues.

As you scan through, some patterns to note are:

  1. Entries pertaining to all three components, as well as a basic project plan, are found in the first 30 minutes.
  2. The number of entries about data start out heavy and all but disappear on Day 2.
  3. Entries about code pick up steam toward the middle and end of the project.
  4. Entries about design appear rather consistently throughout the project, with a run of back and forth data-design entries in the middle of Day 1 and a similar back and forth run of code-design entries at the end of Day 2. Interesting!

Planning = Planning
= Data
Design = Design
Code = Code

Day 1 – November 7, 2012

8:15 AM Planning “Want to make a map?” -Dave
8:15 AM Planning “Maybe just this one last time. Then I’m retiring.” -Andy
8:20 AM Design How about an election-by-demographics map using the value-by-alpha (VBA) technique?
8:25 AM Code What’s the best technology setup for this? (Polymaps? CSS?).
8:25 AM Planning Let’s get started this way:

  • Andy: prepare the data
  • Dave: get interactive setup going
  • Ben: put together an interface design
8:30 AM Data I’m exploring election data from The Guardian in Excel.
9:05 AM Data What kinds of demographic data would be worth mapping? Which are affected by geography?
9:05 AM Design What kind of chart should accompany the map?
9:15 AM Design Margin of victory versus demographic variable by county sounds like a decent chart.
9:25 AM Data Here’s a Shapefile with geographic and election+demographic data.
9:25 AM Planning We need to share this file with the world.
9:25 AM Data Let’s explore the Shapefile in indiemapper.
9:30 AM Design We should wait and share this data once it’s all cleaned up.
9:40 AM Data Here’s a second version of the Shapefile with our map data.
10:00 AM Data What’s the best way to store the data? A series of JSON files?.
10:05 AM Data What scale is appropriate for the county boundary data? Will we need to zoom in?
10:10 AM Data There’s no need for detailed, large-scale county data.
10:10 AM Data Let’s store data and geography separately.
10:10 AM Data I’m preparing the data in Google Refine.
10:20 AM Design Anyone have good red/blue color specs?
10:25 AM Design Here are two 5-class sequential color schemes, one for red and one for blue.
10:30 AM Data Looks like there are problems with this data.
“It has Obama winning most of Wyoming handily.” -Andy
10:40 AM Data “In Colorado, that’s showing the Constitution Party candidate!” -Andy
10:55 AM Data I’m fighting with pivot tables in Excel. Trying to get sums into columns instead of grouped in rows.
11:00 AM Planning “Back in a moment… need to go do something to my car before it starts raining.” -Andy
11:45 AM Data Here’s a third version of the Shapefile with our map data.
11:50 AM Design Here’s a VBA map showing county margin of victory by population.
11:50 AM Design Switch to black background.
11:55 AM Design Let’s go with 2-class winners. It’s too hard to see both change in color and alpha.
12:05 PM Design Here are new red and blue color specs.
12:10 PM Design Here’s a new VBA map showing county winner (2-class) by population.
12:10 PM Design “That’s looking pretty okay.” -Dave
12:10 PM Design How is population classified? The map looks kinda bright, making it hard to see population differences.
12:10 PM Design Should we go with equal-interval or unclassed population instead of quantiles?
12:20 PM Data “Argh, this stupid data. Chicago is red!” -Andy
12:25 PM Data For unclassed data, opacity should be a percentage of the max, right?
12:25 PM Design “Los Angeles is ruining it for everybody.” -Dave
12:30 PM Data How about capping the population values at a certain threshold?
12:50 PM Design Here’s a new VBA map showing winner by population, capped at the 90th percentile.
12:55 PM Data What about going with population density instead, in order to control for county size?
12:55 PM Design Here’s a new VBA map showing winner by population density.
1:20 PM Data Here’s the fourth version of a Shapefile with our map data.
“Gave up on Excel, used a Python. Er, Python, not a Python. No snakes involved.” -Andy
1:25 PM Design The user interface mockups are done.
2:00 PM Code Maybe we ought to go with D3 so we can use a map projection.
2:05 PM Design Does using VBA even make sense for mapping demographic variables? What if there is no real correlation between the demographic variable and county winner? VBA might be best for things that are magnitudes or certainty.
2:15 PM Design It’s worth a try. In the end, it’s just a bivariate color scheme.
2:25 PM Data Here’s the final version of the Shapefile with our map data.
2:25 PM Planning Let’s tweet that data.
2:25 PM Data I’m still not sure if population or population density makes more sense here. If we think of VBA as a cartogram, shouldn’t we just map totals?
3:05 PM Design Does this map need a legend?
3:10 PM Planning How should we proceed, now that we’ve got data and an interface design?
3:15 PM Planning What exactly are we trying to make here? A static map viewer? A basic interactive map with data probe and linked chart?
3:20 PM Code If it’s a static map viewer, how about using indiemapper + SVG?
3:25 PM Code There are problems getting a good data probe and chart that way, plus the SVG is too huge.
3:30 PM Code D3 and JSON is sounding like the best approach.
3:45 PM Code The D3 shell is made.
“It was an election day sweep for President Robert Smith of the Goth Party.” -Dave
4:10 PM Code Here’s what it looks like with colored data.
4:20 PM Data The JSON files are ready.
4:30 PM Planning Let’s divide up the remaining work (data probe, data loading, chart, and ui).
4:40 PM Design Let’s put the project data on SVN so it’s easier to work together.
4:55 PM Data Any other interesting demographic variables we should be mapping?
5:15 PM Data Here is poverty:
5:30 PM Data Here is uninsured:
6:10 PM Data Data loading is complete for five demographic variables (birth rate, medicare, poverty, uninsured, wealthy, and non-white).
9:05 PM Design We should go back to quantiles for the demographic data so the maps look balanced with respect to alpha.
9:10 PM Design We probably need non-linear alpha steps to make them look right. Differences should be optical, not mathematical.
9:40 PM Data Can we get data indexed by FIPS code in those JSON files?

Day 2 – November 8, 2012

8:30 AM Design Yeah, let’s do 10-class quantiles for the demographic variables.
8:45 AM Data Get rid of Alaska and Hawaii. There’s no data for those in the source.
8:50 AM Code The 10-class quantile maps are online.
8:50 AM Design They still look too bright overall.
8:55 AM Data Let’s problem solve any data issues. Class breaks and data distribution look okay, at least.
9:05 AM Design Let’s try that non-linear alpha scale to even these out visually.
9:10 AM Design “That’s hella-nicer.” -Dave
9:15 AM Design What kind of instructions will people need to understand these maps? E.g., Brightness is NOT margin of victory.
9:25 AM Code A basic chart is working.
9:25 AM Code How can we easily link the map and chart on mouseover?
9:30 AM Code Try looping through counties to find matches.
9:30 AM Design Here’s a new, cleaner, down-pointing triangle PNG for the user interface.
9:30 AM Code How’s that chart looking?
9:35 AM Code Are the fonts in the mockup on TypeKit?
9:40 AM Design Yep, that’s Ubuntu Regular and Condensed.
9:55 AM Code We need a red and blue PNG for the bars in the chart.
10:10 AM Code The new fonts are in.
10:25 AM Design We need a better way to do the x-axis labels on the chart. They get buried and probably aren’t very clear.
10:25 AM Code Let’s drop in an Axis Maps Logo.
10:30 AM Design Does the page feel too tall? Can we fix that without shrinking the map?
10:40 AM Design Here’s a mockup showing new chart labels.
10:55 AM Code Implemented the new chart label design.
11:00 AM Design Let’s put in an active state for the selected variable text in the UI.
11:05 AM Code Implemented the new active state.
11:05 AM Design There’s a problem with positioning the divider in the new chart labels design. How about a text pipe instead?
11:15 AM Code Implemented chart label tweak.
11:20 AM Design Horizontal page scrolling won’t go away.
11:25 AM Code The scrolling problem is fixed.
11:25 AM Design Let’s give the map a final look over.
11:30 AM Code Let’s stick in a new map title and add some instructions for users.
11:30 AM Design Dang. The page gets cut-off in Firefox.
11:45 AM Code The FF page problem is fixed.
11:50 AM Design Dang. The chart isn’t showing up in Safari.
12:05 PM Code The Safari chart problem is fixed.
12:10 PM Planning Let’s tweet this map to the world!
1 Comment

The Aesthetician and the Cartographer

October 2, 2012

An ugly map

Sometime around 2006, when everyone and their grandma started cranking out terrible Google Maps mashups, the Cartography world soiled its collective underpants as it looked like the once specialized profession was about to become obsolete. Fear was channeled into outrage at the whole idea of the “democratization of cartography” because it facilitated—encouraged, perhaps—the production of bad maps that ignored everything Cartographers had learned and taught over the years. In other words, “they took our jobs!

Eventually we all calmed down when we saw that people still appreciated good cartography and there was still a place in the world for us—probably even more room for us than before. Then the tools improved by leaps and bounds, to the point now where it’s possible to use them for good web cartography and it’s easy to make maps beautiful. But it might be time to get uppity again.

There is a potential problem in that last thing: beautiful maps. These are prized an awful lot these days, and I’m worried that it’s distracting everyone from the real essence of cartography and the problems that needed or still need to be solved. There seems to be an idea floating around that Cartography is now winning the War on Bad Maps because we’ve defeated Ugliness. TileMill hype is an easy thing to point to here: consider MapBox’s repeated use of the word “beautiful”; or Brian Timoney’s recent, justified praise of the accessibility and openness of TileMill’s newest capabilities, unfortunately framed in the familiar GIS versus Cartography divide that treats the latter as little more than cosmetic surgery, aesthetic touches separable from the rest of the mapping process. Meanwhile with some regularity a web map project seems to find the ultimate “success” of ending up in an art exhibition or winning the Purtiest Map Evar Award.

It all brings into question what Cartography really is (and isn’t) or needs to be in the modern web mapping world, something I’ve been pondering a lot over the past year. (Big-C “Cartography” is used here to mean the the specific profession, theories, and body of knowledge, not simply the making of any maps.) Yes, a good cartographer has graphic design skills and an eye for beauty, but as a discipline and profession it is not about aesthetics.

A beautiful map

Beauty is unquestionably important in cartography. It’s what turns functional maps into good maps and good maps into great maps. And we don’t need to be above putting form over function sometimes. Eye candy sells, and sometimes grabbing attention or being just plain artsy is whole the point of a map. The number of beautiful maps floating around lately, the public appreciation of them, and the proliferation of tools that make them possible are all very pleasing developments. We shouldn’t mistake aesthetics for Cartography itself, though. Cartographic expertise is, in essence, knowing the right way to represent geographic phenomena and data for analytical or various other purposes, and understanding of all stages of the mapping process, not simply knowing how to swoop in at the end and make a map pretty. Sure, we can make every map delicious by wrapping it in metaphorical (or real?) bacon, but it won’t be good for you.*

It’s so much easier to see the aesthetic side of maps than all the informed decisions behind them, and now that it no longer takes specialists to use the production tools and code, aesthetics start to look like the only area where specialized Cartography comes in. We don’t talk about the real Cartography enough for it to be chracterized otherwise. For every blog post or tweet you see about the newest cool graphical capability of Mapnik or d3 or anything else, how many do you see giving advice on when to use it?

Just as we always associated ArcMap with “ugly” and Illustrator with “pretty,” aesthetics continue to be tied to specific tools, and GIS and cartography people still let themselves be defined by the tools they use despite the trends away from reliance on a single piece of software. As usual we have the problem of knowing tools versus knowing concepts. It’s vital to know tools and understand how they work, of course, but in the end they’re only as useful as the operator’s knowledge of cartographic concepts. Today’s tools are new, but a lot of the amazing new capabilities we’re seeing are not new at all; they’re just better implementations. They lower a lot of barriers and have big impacts, sure, but tools are still only tools. BYOCartography.

(When it’s not aesthetics or tools, by the way, it’s the idea that map = data. You can see this in the Apple Maps uproar. But that’s a different kettle of fish for another day.)

I don’t want Cartography to be reduced to mastery of pulling levers to make pretty things. Not because I fear for my career—I can pull levers with the best of them—but rather because it limits the gains in the quality of web mapping. You don’t need to have an advanced degree in Cartography or be an old-school Cartographer to make good maps, but you do need to take the time to understand the when and why of mapping techniques, not just the how.

A map that needs some 'splainin

The traditional Cartographic solution to this kind of problem is to complain and criticize, but we need to point out what’s right more than what’s wrong. (Yeah, yeah, irony here. But think of this post as more of a lament than criticism.) After all, it’s not that bad things are happening—quite the opposite—it’s just that a lot of good things remain invisible and left out of the conversation. So next time you make a killer map, don’t just talk about how you did it; talk also about why you made the design choices you did. Let’s make it understood that there is more to Cartography than aesthetic sensibilities and technical skill, and encourage all mapmakers to be true Cartographers.



* You’ll have a cart attack. Ha!

7 Comments

Advice to the Aspiring Interactive Cartographer

September 2, 2012

I often get emails from recent geo-grads or new professional students asking something like:

“I’m looking to expand my skills to make interactive maps. What do I need to know to become an interactive cartographer?”

Because our industry is evolving at such breakneck speeds, the required skill sets are constantly changing. Flash actionscript code has been replaced by Javascript and HTML5. Basemap cartography is endlessly tweaked as Mapnik XML instead of Illustrator layers. We can easily build and support our own tile servers. It’s exciting change and it allows us to do more with our maps faster and cheaper.

Unfortunately, if you’re trying to break into interactive cartography and haven’t been involved with its evolution on a daily basis, it can be very tough to know where to begin. It’s no longer as easy as “learn ArcView if you want to be a GIS Tech, or Illustrator if you want to be a cartographer.”

However, while the tools may be changing month-by-month, there have been three broad areas of core competency for all interactive cartographers that have been consistent throughout:

  1. You need to be able to find, manipulate, and store spatial and non-spatial data.
  2. You need to be able to design a functional and attractive cartographic representation of that data as well as the UI controls to operate it
  3. You need to be able to implement that design through code

Working with data is probably the most underestimated part of a cartographer’s job. The steps required to go from source to ready-to-map are different for every dataset, but there are some general tasks you’ll come across at some point. You’ll need to be able to find data, navigating though state GIS websites designed in the 1970’s for administrative boundaries or combing though big data repositories (US Census, World Bank) for a single supplementary attribute. Once you find your data, you’ll need to be able to manipulate it to work with the other datasets required for your map. This is where you’ll put that GIS education to good use but more often than not you’ll find yourself trying to remember how Excel Pivot Tables work. With the data ready to be mapped, you’ll need to decide how to store it and how your map will retrieve it. Simple data can be stored in a text file like CSV (that you’re probably already comfortable with) but more complex data will often require a database. It’s really helpful to know a bit about data structures, and feel comfortable enough with a server to do some basic installation and maintenance.

Design for an interactive map comes in two separate but highly connected pieces. Cartographic design involves designing the “map” part of the map. Most of the design decisions you’ll make during this phase of design are no different than if you were doing cartographic design for a paper map. Is this the right thematic representation of this data? Does my visual hierarchy clearly communicate the message of this map? Is my basemap garish and stupid, drawing attention away from the point I’m trying to make? You’ll also need to design the UI controls to operate the map. This is a much harder skill to cultivate and is most likely something you haven’t been exposed to in your GIS / cartography curriculum. The best way to get to be a better designer is to look critically at lots and lots of web maps. Compartmentalize their interface components and decide for yourself what works on them. Steal the stuff that works and think about how the stuff that doesn’t could be improved. Learn how to quickly make UI mock-ups and wireframes of your map. Iterate over your designs before you build them, using that critical eye you’ve developed critiquing other people’s work on your own. Repeat for 2 weeks or so and then put it down because it’s probably good enough.

Andy said this best:

“Our coding process goes something like this. 1) Load the data. 2) Make things work. 3) Make things pretty. Like I mentioned before, having everything designed ahead of time is vital. We can start with something rough but functional without worrying about design, because we already know how it will look and behave in the end. It also lets us know when we’re finished; interactive projects have a way of never ending if there are no clear goals at the outset.

“After hearing from enough of my cartography peers whose hatred of programming burns with the fire of a thousand suns, I must say this: yes, coding sucks. I write code all the time, and it often makes me want to punch the computer in the face. But it’s worth it. Totally worth it. It only takes a little skill to produce awesome things. A willingness to write some code opens a lot of doors, and it doesn’t require devoting a lifetime to becoming a master programmer. It doesn’t even require being a good programmer.”

If you’re an absolute beginner this is a great place to learn the basics. Then, choose a mapping library that you like (they’re all good) that will do what you need it to do and run through the basic tutorial (usually gets you a basic map on a blank page). Once you’ve got that down, all you have to do is start putting in the hours at the keyboard.

Axis Maps has always been a small company with a very strong DIY ethos (just ask Ben who can now add “shipping tycoon” to his CV). My favorite part of working on projects here is we’re constantly learning how to solve the hundreds of problems that come up through the course of any project. You’ll never know how to do it all yourself but if you give yourself a good foundation in the basic concepts, you can start making maps and learning as you go like the rest of us.

Pirate NG Kids

5 Comments

“But hasn’t everything already been mapped?”

December 15, 2011

In a recent post I remarked on the common reaction people have when I say that I’m a cartographer. In my experience people are usually mildly astounded and fascinated by this exotic profession (and just like that we are new best pals), and as the conversation progresses they ask if that means something like Google Maps. But sometimes it’s the most dreaded, annoying question that every cartographer has heard: “hasn’t everything already been mapped?”

There is of course a real answer to that question (perhaps it’s something like, “everywhere, but not everything” or perhaps it’s “there’s actually this one spot in Idaho we haven’t hit yet”), but it’s more amusing to dwell on the things we cartographers hear from our new acquaintances than on what we say in reply. In that spirit, a week or two ago I posed the following on Twitter:

Survey time. Cartographers, fill in the blank based on your experience. Person: “What do you do?” You: “I’m a cartographer.” Person: ______

It generated some excellent replies. If you’re not a cartographer, when you meet one remember that these are things we’ve all heard. If you are a cartographer, please comment to share your experiences too!

@stefanie_gray has heard several good ones.

“You’re a cartographer? But isn’t the map done?!” (Yes, there is only one map! Ever! And it’s DONE!)

“Why would you study cartography if every place has been discovered?” (Uh, did I say I was in ‘conquistador studies’?)

“Hahaha making maps? On the computer? There’s already Google Maps, no need for anything else!”

@wallacetim‘s neighbor doesn’t like his prospects.

“Where’s the money in that?”

@kg_geomapper seems to hang around a mix of high-tech and low-tech map users.

Person: [response always involves mention of either a road atlas or google maps!]

I also get “oh yea, I love old historical maps”

@mapgeek reports a modern twist on the old “hasn’t everything been mapped” bit. Google did it!

“But hasn’t everywhere already been mapped by google?” aargh

She has also, much to my horror, encountered someone who is less than impressed with cartography. And from a geologist at that!

I also got a “god, how boring” response once!

I think he may have been something to do with geology! oh the irony!

@fgcartographix has also found uninterested people (which is too bad, because I usually count on cartography for an easy conversation topic) but also the usual Googlers.

Person: and then changing the subject.

Person: There’s still area to map with Google Earth? (got that one twice…)

@desjardins meets people who have a passing familiarity with a dictionary.

“um, so what does a cartographer do?” or “that’s maps or something, right?”

@NadiiaGorash knows a similar crowd.

Person: WHO?!? Me: …. Person: I see. Mapmaker!

But @nichom finds people a step behind.

Person: < blink> (mental search for what ‘cartographer’ means) Me: I make maps. Person: Cool! (let fun conversation ensue)

@vtcraghead points out that those with good taste (my judgment, not necessarily his) may know about cartography because of Arrested Development.

We are living in the shadow of Buster: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj7RlQdF25A

@clubjosh has figured out a good reply to the standard line.

usually get the “hasn’t everything been mapped” line which gets my “Yeah, but some moron keeps changing things” retort

@g_fiske talks to the good ones. The ones who appreciate us.

Person: “Oh, I love maps!”

And @musingbouche is not a cartographer, but knows what to say if she meets one.

cool!

Did I miss any? Comment on this post with any other good ones you’ve heard!

15 Comments

Map Evolution 2

September 9, 2010



Over the summer, a friend asked me to put together a map of Punta Gorda, a small coastal town in the country of Belize. He works for Hillside Health Care International, a non-profit organization providing medical care in that area. The map was needed to help orient and guide volunteer health care professionals visiting from the States while serving at the clinic. It was to be printed in color on a letter-sized page.

In talking with my friend, I knew right away that the biggest obstacle was going to be getting good local data for the map (and getting it for free, because there was no money set aside for the project). Most importantly, I needed data for local roads (locations and names) and point features (hotels, government buildings, grocery stores, banks, etc.), these being the two main pieces he wanted clinic volunteers to have at their disposal.

Of the big free mapping services, Google Maps had the most complete road network for the town, so it served as my starting point. I had hoped there might be a nice Open Street Map shapefile to work from, but this area is still mostly a blank slate:

View of Punta Gorda in Open Street Map

So, I decided the simplest and easiest approach to getting those roads on the map would be to trace them in Adobe Illustrator. That’s where the remainder of the map design work was planned, and there was no good reason to construct a spatial database or harness the powers of GIS for our purposes, let alone the time and money to do so. We knew this would limit what what could be done with the map in the future, but a simple map illustration existing wholly outside of a GIS served our immediate purposes on the cheap.

The point features were collected in the field by my friend, who personally biked the streets of Punta Gorda and used his local knowledge and that of others who live there to collect and verify the names and locations of streets and places. His work was all done by hand by annotating an early draft of the map. While he was collecting data, I finished the layout and styling. Then, with his annotations overlaid on my working version, I placed markers at each point of interest (red and blue shapes and National Park Service-style symbols), added labels, and created the index that sits in the lower right-hand corner of the map.

Throughout the production process I captured screen shots showing the evolution of the map. When it was finished I sequenced them together to form a simple movie, as I did for the evolution of a map of downtown Madison, WI. Each screen represents about 10-15 minutes of real production work. While this PDF shows the final state of the map, the Punta Gorda movie (see it bigger here) shows how I got there. As you’ll see, it generally involved the transformation of a satellite image into a map by way of a healthy dose of cartographic abstraction and symbolization.

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Ed Parsons dislikes cartographers, “more than anyone in the world”

November 5, 2009

The title was one of the opening statements made by Google’s “technology evangelist” Ed Parsons in a recent talk for the British Computer Society. In the talk he argues traditional street maps are bad (all of them) because they fail to engender a sense of place and because they abstract the world using map symbols. He goes on to say Streetview is good and doesn’t suffer any of these problems. So is Google Earth. The take-home message is that 2D is bad! Maps symbols are bad! Photos are good! And paper is bad! [subtext: Google doesn’t make paper, but if we did, we might soften our stance].

Here is my concern: I’m not aware of any research to support such simplistic claims. Merely saying them, repeatedly, doesn’t make them true. The wayfinding research that I have seen shows that for some users, for some map reading tasks, yes, absolutely Streetview and Virtual Earths and geo-tagged photos can help. And for some users and some situations paper is better than pixels. And for some users, and some kinds of data, 2D is better than 3D. But none of those statements is a blanket truth and by outright rejecting all traditional maps in his talk–even if just for wayfinding on mobile devices–an otherwise solid argument is overshadowed by hyperbole.

If drug companies made arguments like these they might try to convince us by saying “Aspirin is bad. Aspirin may make your arms fall off. But our new drug has none of these problems. Use our new drug.” The difference is drug companies are legally obligated to back-up their claims. It is perhaps the reason they don’t employ “evangelists.”

The deeper, more troubling message that we hear again and again is that cartography is little more than making street maps.  And the flip side of that coin is the only reason we use maps is for wayfinding. Streetview is very cool (it really is), but it is also pretty specialized in its uses and the advent of it does not in fact “kill cartography.”

Cartography is more than taking photographs of a street. It’s a shame that someone with this level of influence at Google has such a limited view of why we map.

8 Comments

Data Probing and Info Window Design on Web-based Maps

July 13, 2009

Info windows are the familiar pop-up balloons that often appear when interacting with features on a map. This activity is generally called data probing. For example, click on a Google Maps marker and up comes a little bubble with information about the place. The uses for data probing are seemingly limitless, ranging from the retrieval of map-based comments, annotations, and descriptions of ‘what’s here?’, to map stats and info graphics, to map use instructions (e.g., “get directions”), explanations (e.g., “group of 3 markers”), and controls (e.g., “zoom here”), to alternate map views (e.g., an historical map). All of this, of course, can come through in the form of text, photos, audio, and video.

Data probing is essential. In one sense, its needed because we’ve got tons of data about the world, but just small, low-resolution computer screens to view it all on. Like a drop-down list or an accordion menu on a Web page, data probing is a design compromise that can save space on maps. In another sense, however, data probing is an important design decision that can help direct map readers’ attention and understanding from the general to the specific by offering details on demand. Without data probing, we’d either have crazy-cluttered maps or watered-down maps not taking advantage of all of that rich data out there.

Of course, data probing is everywhere outside of mapping as well; on charts, graphs and all sorts of other info graphics. But here I focus on Web maps, specifically on info window design, and outline some major design considerations and provide a few examples that could help inspire your next effort.

Design Considerations
1) Size
Large footprint info windows hold lots of data but end up obscuring much of the map itself. Often, it’s the geographical context and the distribution of data around a probed location that’s helpful for a more complete understanding of a place. When an info window obscures the map, the missing section must be held temporarily in a user’s working memory until the window is closed. For this reason, it’s usually worth minimizing this kind of cognitive load and coming up with ways to make info windows more compact.

Compactness depends a lot on the volume of data that will wind up in the info window. Tiny, “tool tip”-sized window are great for small amounts of data, like a summary statistic, geographical feature name or ID, or a line of text. Larger windows, holding multiline text, images, etc., typically range between 250-350px wide and 100-400px tall. On some maps, both sizes can be used in tandem to good effect, like in the University of Wisconsin Campus Map (below).

University of Wisconsin, Campus Map

University of Wisconsin Campus Map, showing large and small info windows.

Instead of expanding much beyond the larger size mentioned, its worth considering ways of organizing info window content to keep the footprint compact. One solution we really like is the idea of using tabs to categorize content and/or mini-slideshows for previewing distinct chunks of material. EveryBlock’s city maps and Stamen Design’s London 2012 map are good examples:

EveryBlock city map

EveryBlock info window, showing mini-slideshow content.

London 2012 map

London 2012 info window, showing tabbed content.

We also like the idea of info windows that re-size dynamically (within limits) to best fit their content. When content is just a bit larger than a probe window, this can prevent the need for a scroll bar, which just creates extra work for the map user. Conversely, when content is small, the window shrinks to fit, avoiding big blank spaces that unnecessarily obscure the map. Really large amounts of content, like a full news article, are probably best presented on a new page or somewhere off the map and retrieved via hypertext links (e.g., “full text”).

Avoid too much empty space

Avoid too much empty space.

2) Position
If we apply what we learn from Eduard Imhof’s work on label positioning, the preferred place for an info window attached to points and other small objects would be to the right and somewhat above it. In contrast, left and in-line positioning would be less desirable, although Imhof acknowledges that any placement is permissible and sometimes even necessary. Compared to positioning map labels, however, info windows are somewhat of a unique challenge. This is partly because they tend to be larger in size and partly because of our interest in keeping them on screen when opened near the edges of a map or application window.

Avoid cutting-off info windows.

Avoid cutting-off info windows.

Perhaps the most common approach to keeping info windows on the screen is to auto-pan the map. This works especially well if the map extent is limitless in all directions, because there’s no concern about auto-panning off the edge. Too much auto panning, however, can be disorienting, especially when the action itself is unexpected or the distance and speed of panning are too great. Auto panning can also be disrupting to users, due to a change in the map extent, which can alter the location or visibility of markers and data layers previously in view.

One ‘smart’ info window that I really like repositions itself left/right/top/bottom around a probed location to stay on screen AND minimize the amount of auto-panning. There’s a working example and source code for this by Dmitir Abramov. Maybe, a ‘super-smart’ info window would also be aware of related geo-data (e.g., map markers) and reposition itself to minimize contact with that, as well?

3) Stem
The info window stem is the visual link that connects it to a probed location. The problem of obscuring map context in the immediate spatial neighborhood can be solved by lengthening and/or shifting the stem along the window’s edge. It’s often the immediate geographical context that we’re most interested in, anyway. The question, ‘what’s near here?’ can be as interesting, if not more interesting than ‘what’s here?’. So, generally speaking, we prefer longish tails, but can think of cases where a short tail would be preferred (e.g., like on cell phone maps or other tiny map windows).

Longer stems can reveal neighboring map content.

Longer stems can reveal neighboring map content.

Another option is to go without a stem at all, which keeps the area around a probed location totally open. The strong connection between location and info window is lost, but this can be restored to some degree with a highlighting technique, like in the The New York Times map, Geography of a Recession, below. Here, the highlight (black outline) gives users positive feedback and helps link it to the info window, which appears/disappears on mouse-over/off. For stemless windows that are persistent, (i.e., require a click to open and/or close) highlighting becomes even more important to maintain this visual connection.

New York Times, Geography of a Recession.

New York Times info window without a stem.

4) Open/Close
Opening and closing an info window should be immediately obvious to users. The advantage of mouse-over windows, like in the NYTimes example above, is that they appear with almost no effort at all and can’t easily be missed. However, this ‘always on’ nature can make if feel ‘in the way’ sometimes, especially if finding non-probable map or window space takes work.

A really obvious “X” button in the upper right corner is maybe the most immediately obvious way to close a probe. Clicking ‘away’ from the info window itself can also be effective, as long as other uses for a mouse click are also considered. In other words, should an info window close upon click+drag map panning? (Probably not.) Should it close when another location is probed via mouse click? (Probably, yes.)

One option that I don’t see too much of is that for opening multiple info windows simultaneously. Two or more open windows is very basic, yet invaluable, way of comparing details across locations. Universal Mind’s LaunchPad demo (below) allows users to open multiple info windows and then drag-and-drop them anywhere on the map. A similar approach might give users the option of “pinning” info windows to the map at their stem points, thus maintaining stronger visual linkages to locations. Perhaps, the windows could also be repositioned, with stems changing in length and direction.

Universal Mind, LaunchPad

Universal Mind's LaunchPad, showing multiple info windows.

5) Look and Feel

  • Drop Shadow. Drop shadows helps focus attention on info windows, elevating them above other map content and setting them apart from visually complex map backgrounds.
  • Window Corners. Choice of square or rounded corners is mostly a stylistic decision. If rounded, make sure that the corner radius stays constant when scaling dynamically (9-slice scaling works well for this).
  • Title. Window titles should help users answer basic questions like, ‘what are we looking at here?’, or ‘what is the name / address of this probed location?’
  • Graphic Styles. Good use of type styles and colors, background color, and/or subtle divider lines can help organize content and go along way in making it faster and easier to read.
  • Stem Position and Angle. Stems positioned too closely to a corner can appear somewhat unstable. An angled stem, as opposed to a stem that extends perpendicularly from a side, can add a bit of visual interest, but too sharp of an angle can appear awkward, as shown below. Corner-anchored stems, although more uncommon, distance a window farther from its location than side-anchored stems, assuming equal lengths. They seem to appear most stable when extending at about 45 degrees (see below).
Stems at steep angles or near corners appear less stable

Stems at steep angles or near corners appear less stable.

Corner stems appear most stable at a 45-degree angle.

Corner stems appear most stable at a 45-degree angle.

Alternatives to Info Windows
There are plenty of examples in which data probing doesn’t bring up an info window at all. Rather, data is presented in some other part of the page or user interface. Although obscuring map surface area can be avoided this way, one issue to consider is split attention. This can weaken linkages and create more work for the user, whose attention has to be in multiple places–and potentially across large distances–on screen. OpenStreetMap and Flickr’s Yahoo! Maps mashup are both good examples of this alternative.

OpenStreetMap.

OpenStreetMap splits apart a probed location (blue outline) and its related info.

Flickr map

Flickr's map splits apart a probed location (white star outline) and its info.

Other Examples of Info Windows
1) Bing Maps
Mouse over/off to open/close. Dynamic window and stem positioning. No auto-panning. Short stem. Dynamic scaling.

Bing Maps

Bing Maps

2) Google Maps
Click to open/close. Window and stem are fixed position. Auto-pan to stay on screen. Long stem. Dynamic scaling.

Google Maps

Google Maps

3) Stamen Design, Oakland Crimespotting
Click to open/close. Scrolling content. Fixed size and position. Short stem. Slight semi-transparent background.

Stamen Design, Oakland Crimespotting

Stamen Design, Oakland Crimespotting

4) Washington post, Time-Space: World
Modified Google info window. Click to open/close (small info window on mouse-over). Blue scroll buttons move between points in the cluster for a unique way of organizing content.

Washington Post, Time-Space: World

Washington Post, Time-Space: World

5) Yahoo! Maps
Click to open/close (small info window on mouse-over). Window and stem are fixed position. Auto-pan to stay on screen. Short, almost non-existent, stem. Dynamic scaling.

Yahoo! Maps

Yahoo! Maps

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ARRA funding map

April 30, 2009

ARRA Funding Map

Lots of maps are coming out that document when, where, and how stimulus money is being spent through the ARRA, like these at the Foundation Center. With all of the reporting, accountability, and transparency required of ARRA grant recipients, I’m sure we’ll only be seeing a lot more of these in the future. Recovery.gov directs traffic to states’ Web sites where some of this data is appearing. I’m looking forward to seeing more and more mash-ups and interactive maps and graphics as developers and designers get their hands on this stuff and data from other sources that track stimulus money.

Our Map

For now, we decided to get involved by putting together a static map that shows where our ARRA tax dollars are going for energy-related programs administered by the DOE. As underlying layers, the map shows states’ historical energy consumption trends and their projected trends required to meet consumption goals set for 2012.

I’m sure we could all talk about the politics around ARRA funding and energy consumption and how this might or might not be shaped by patterns that the map does or doesn’t show. But to me, a few of the most interesting things about this map are related to its design:

1) Encoding data in state boundaries

I’ve always been attracted to National Geographic political reference maps, with their countries each outlined in a different color. On those maps, outline color clearly helps distinguish one place from another. Plenty of other maps use enumeration unit outlines to represent data, too, like those that categorize administrative boundaries using line weight, dashes and dots, etc. I wondered what was to stop the application of this idea to a thematic map? Why not try to take it one step further and encode numerical data, as opposed to nominal data, in unit outlines? I haven’t seem many examples of this.

The main limitations here are line weight and unit size. Line weight has to be heavy enough so that color can be seen and read. For my map, this seemed to work best above around 4 pts. Only thing is, as enumeration units get smaller, the outline can eat up more interior space and obscure the presence of a second data set, which in this case is the historical energy consumption trend, encoded using unit fill color. So, I had to cheat a little bit with some small states and states with small pieces (e.g., Delaware and Maryland) and decrease the line weights a bit under 4 pts. I don’t see this approach working very well with really small enumeration units like US counties, unless the map scale is really huge.

2) Color selection

The challenge here was to select colors for three data sets (historical energy, projected energy, and ARRA money) that not only encoded data properly but were harmonious (i.e., not competing or ugly). The historical energy data set has a natural midpoint around zero, so it needed a diverging color scheme. On the other hand, the projected energy data, having no midpoint, required a sequential scheme (thanks to ColorBrewer 2.0 for both sets of specs). Proportional rings for ARRA money just needed to be readable and look nice on top of the other colors.

Here are some earlier attempts at getting color right. In my first try, I used a grayscale sequential ramp for the historical data (state fill color), matching the middle value to the map’s background for a pseudo-diverging ramp feel. But this seemed overly subtle and downplayed the importance of clearly distinguishing states with decreasing and increasing energy consumption trends.

First attempt at color.

First attempt at color.

So, my next try was to replace the grayscale ramp with a true diverging ramp. Yuck. The mix of red outlines and fill colors bothered me on an purely aesthetic level. Other diverging ramps with other hues in them produced similarly ugly results.

Second attempt at color

Second attempt at color.

The final colors for historical energy consumption trends (blue-white-red) seem to best emphasize the data’s midpoint, with red doing its part to connote “alarm” in the states with a poor track record. The projected energy consumption data set is now lower down in the visual hierarchy (shown using a grayscale color ramp on state outlines), but this seems to be acceptable compromise. Using gray prevents these two ramps from competing for attention or overlapping and confusing the map reader. From my perspective, at least, it also results in an (yes, subjective) improvement in overall color harmony.

Other thoughts about the ARRA funding map? Please add them to the comments.

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Virtual Globes are a seriously bad idea for thematic mapping

April 17, 2009

Google Earth is amazing. As we’ve commented here before, it continues to blow our minds and has also done wonders for the popularity of maps. And let’s be honest, it looks super cool. There is no doubt that Google Earth is much sexier than that boring old atlas collecting dust on your shelf: It’s interactive, seamlessly integrates distributed data sources, animates the surface of the earth over time, facilities virtual communities, can be customized by both developer and user, etc, etc. It’s hard to not be impressed.

So all of our maps should be in Google Earth, right?

Wrong.

In fact, despite recent efforts to create a suite of thematic mapping approaches, Google Earth is a terrible environment for presenting many kinds of thematic maps. I’d go so far as to say that the 3D prism maps and 3D graduated symbol maps we see popping up in Google Earth are pure chart junk, of the kind Tufte warned us about repeated for past 25 years.

3D prism map of population in Google Earth

3D prism map in Google Earth (blog.thematicmapping.org)

3D human figures as proportional symbols

3D human figures as proportional symbols (blog.thematicmapping.org)

CHART JUNK

Chart junk takes what should have been a simple-to-read graphic and makes extracting information (1) slower, (2) more difficult, and (3) more prone to reading errors, because of excessive ornamentation and unnecessary design additions—like adding a 3D effect that communicates nothing in and of itself but simply “looks cool.” This is not idle speculation: Research consistently shows chart junk and “redundant ink” hurt otherwise fine graphics.

Want to see for yourself? Download these two example KML/KMZ files from blog.thematicmapping.org and run them in Google Earth. While you’re looking at them try to extract numbers or compare places: KMZ File 1 |  KML File 2

“BUT THEY LOOK COOL”: A TECHNOLOGY IN SEARCH OF A PROBLEM

As Abraham Maslow said, “If the only tool you have is a hammer, you will see every problem as a nail.” This seems to be the case with virtual globes and the developers who love them and insist that any and all kinds of thematic data belong there. Instead, I’d challenge us to take a step back and ask,

WHY DO WE MAKE THEMATIC MAPS?

For a long time folks like Robinson, Dent, and MacEachren have been arguing that thematic maps exist to support two basic tasks: (1) the ability to extract numbers/facts about specific places (e.g., 15C in Paris) and (2) the ability to judge those values in geographic relation to other places (e.g., 5C warmer than London, about the same as Milan). In other words, we want both specific details and overall patterns to be obvious on our thematic maps. And we want all of that AT A GLANCE.

The problem with digital globes (as with all globes) is you can’t see half the planet and, due to curvature, really only about a 1/3 of the planet clearly at once. Which leaves us with a conundrum: If you’re only mapping a small place (e.g., a country), why do you need to have it on a globe? And if you have a global dataset, why would you allow your readers to only ever see ½ the data at once? They can rotate the globe (more on this later) but they’ll never be able to see the entire dataset at once. That makes understanding overall patterns very difficult, and asking folks to “remember” half of a global dataset while they spin the globe to the other side is far, far beyond the meager limits of our working memory. If you’re not convinced, just try it.

KNOW YOUR HISTORY

What makes these recent developments even more frustrating is that in the 70s and 80s, with the advent of digital map making, cartographers flirted with, and largely rejected, faux 3D prism maps and 3D graduated symbol maps (like the two examples above) since they suffered from several limits:

    1. visual occlusion (not all of the map can be seen at once since some places hide others)
    2. people suck at estimating volumes, especially of complex shapes (e.g., try estimating the size of moving van you’ll need for your home)
    3. mental rotation of complex shapes is extremely hard, so hard that it is often used as a measure of intelligence in IQ tests.

Many a thesis and dissertation was written in the past 40 years demonstrating these limits to human visual processing.

The nice thing about Virtual Earths is that you can rotate them, so the problem of visual occlusion is solved, right? Yes and no. Yes, interactivity and the ability to rotate the globe can help reveal hidden places, but no, these virtual globes introduce a significant extraneous cognitive load because the user must now think about controlling the globe (not always easy with a mouse) while also trying to focus on the thematic content. In fact, adding a complex task, like visually acquiring the Google Earth controls and then trying to figure out how to move/scale/reposition the globe between two other tasks effectively “flushes” short-term working memory. It’s a kind of mental sorbet, which is why giving folks something distracting to do is a common trick in memory tests (they lose their train of thought). Why would we deliberately do this to our map-readers?

BIG PROBLEM: INCONSISTENT SCALE

In the examples above it is really hard to judge relative sizes. Why? Because the scale of the symbols is constantly changing, and the ones closer to the viewer are much larger (and at a different scale) than the ones far away. Given that it has been long established in cartography that people are terrible at estimating sizes, and even worse at estimating volumes, it is utterly inane to compound this failure by drawing the symbols at different scales. Of course it is worse than this: Rotating the globe slides each symbol through its own scale transformation path, changing in size with every pixel the maps are moved.

This is an absolute rule: If you want to give people the best chance to judge the relative sizes of objects, they should all be drawn at the same scale.

STILL NOT CONVINCED? LET’S DO SOME USER TESTING

Judging height is critical to the success of this map, yet most heights are obscured

Judging height is critical to the success of this map, yet most heights are obscured

TASK #1: As quickly as you can, how does Nepal compare to Uzbekistan?
TASK #2:
As quickly as you can, find all of the other places on the map similar to Nepal? Which place is most similar? Which one least?

Hard, isn’t it? To be honest, it shouldn’t be: A regular 2D classed choropleth map or proportional symbol map would make short work of those questions. So what did we gain by extruding the countries up into space? Not much that I can see.

    1. The Lack of a zero-line referent makes it hard to judge absolute magnitudes.
    2. The “fish eye lens” effect mean each prism is viewed from a different angle than its neighbors, making comparison just a little bit harder as we have to mental account for these differences in our estimates.
    3. It is hard to judge the height of something when you are staring directly down at it. This matters because height is the visual variable that does the “work” in this graphic—it’s how the data are encoded visually. Why obscure the very thing map-readers need to make sense of the graphic (e.g., the side-view height of each polygon)?

SOLUTIONS?

I need to be convinced of two things: (1)  something is fundamentally wrong with our proven and highly efficient planimetric thematic maps, and (2) that reprojecting this data onto a virtual globe somehow solves those problems. Otherwise, we truly have a cool new technology in search of an application, and that’s just putting the cart before the horse.

Some suggestions: First, unless the 3rd dimension communicates something and isn’t merely redundant data already encoded in the colors, sizes, etc., do not include it (for all the reasons outlined above). Second, if you want folks to perform “analytical map reading tasks” such as estimating relative sizes, distances, or densities, keep scale constant. Third, do not obscure parts of the map behind other parts if that isn’t inherently relevant to the data (e.g., this is fine for terrain visualization). Fourth, and most importantly, do some user testing before presenting a new technique as the best thing ever: It’s how research works and why it is important.

So what things are Google Earth (and other Virtual Globes) good for? The consensus around here is (1) to engender, quite powerfully at times, a qualitative “sense of place” or “immersion”; (2) for virtual tourism (e.g., sit on top of Mt Everest) or virtual architecture/planning; and (3) to perform a kind of viewshed analysis and see what can and cannot be seen from locations (line-of-sight). All of those are inherently 3D-map reading tasks in which the immersive, 3D nature of the map is important. By comparison, population data (one number per country) is NOT inherently 3-dimensional and is only made to suffer when dressed-up in prism maps and 3D figurines.

Cartography, like all good design, is about communicating the maximum amount of information with the least amount of ink (or pixels). The world is just too complex and interesting to be wasting our ink/pixels on non-functioning ornamentation.

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SXSW: Axis Maps Roadshow

April 14, 2009

A couple weeks ago I was lucky enough to get invited to the SXSW Interactive conference to speak on a panel called Neocartography: Design and Usability Evolved. Here are some collected thoughts I had from running through the panel again in my head.

Do you need a cartography degree to make maps? As the only trained cartographer on the panel, they just couldn’t wait to ask me this question (could I really say that Stamen’s “non-cartographers” shouldn’t be making maps?). I gave the popular answer, “No,” but with a caveat: “You just need to care about cartographic design.” Elegant design and clear communication are universal to all aspects of design. Cartographers have a slight leg up in the map game because we’ve been using our design chops to get good at applying these universal concepts to maps, but concepts like subtle use of color, visual heirarchy and map / UI composition can directly be applied from graphic design to map design. Incidentally, this is the hardest stuff to teach to cartography students. However, there is a lot of cartographic design that is uniquely geographic. Issues like projections, thematic symbolization and generalization don’t exist outside of maps and largely exist because of the challenges of representing a complex world on a small, flat piece of paper. These same issues remain even moving from paper to the computer screen, but unfortunately they are largely ignored. On a preachy note, I think it is our responsibility as cartographers to CONSTRUCTIVELY engage ourselves with the new mapping discourse.

What’s with neocartography? Neocartography is a tricky definition (one that I think is changing every day) so take the coward’s way out and define it as:

You know… the Where2.0 crowd.

But “Where2.0″ covers it pretty well. Location (that’s the where) is EVERYTHING. It’s an on-demand (that’s the 2.0) reference-map world where apps need to know WHAT you’re looking for so they can tell you WHERE it is. A lot of cartographers (especially those educated in Geography) probably feel disengaged with the new movement because they are looking for “Why3.0.” We want to make thematic maps that explain the world instead of just locating a tiny part of it. And unbelievably, with two people on the panel who helped build it, we never showed off Geocommons Maker and its thematic mapping to the audience. We could have started the Why3.0 movement then and there!

What about the 9,000 lb Google shaped elephant in the room? Instead of listening to me prattle on about projections and choropleth classification schemes, it seemed like the audience would rather hear what Google, represented by Elizabeth, their Maps UX Designer, had to say about mapping. Me too. Even though we are both making maps on the Internet, our issues couldn’t be more different. Where we can agonize over cartographic and UI issues, Google constantly needs to consider issues of scalability. With their maps viewed by millions of people (horrible problem to have, right?), design decisions take on massive significance. The UI and interactivity set worldwide expectations on what an interactive map should be (look at panning / zooming controls on all the major map providers to see their influence). They’ve become masters of the universal elements of cartographic design but have not addressed (or have been constrained by) the uniquely cartographic issues. Because Google sets the tone for mapping on the web, the web-mapping community has believed that these issues cannot or should not be dealt with.

Anything else? Just a couple things:

  • Cloudmade and OpenStreetMap are going to be huge. They are going to improve the state of cartography on the web and engage both experts and the public with mapping in entirely new ways. 
  • GPS is coming to social networks. This is going to be MASSIVELY HUGE. In 3 years, “location-aware” won’t be a buzzword anymore, it will be an assumed feature. There is going to be insane amounts of spatial data and I, for one, cannot wait to face all of the display challenges it’s going to pose.
  • Stamen kicks ass and they’ve set the bar high for top-shelf online mapping. It’s hard to share a stage with Mike Migurski when he has such awesome maps and visualizations at his disposal. What a show-off.
  • It was great to meet Elizabeth and some of the Google Maps team. I wish I could have pried more Google secrets from them but they’re too tight-lipped.
  • Andrew Turner at FortiusOne is one of the most plugged-in, active people working in the neocartography field. Thanks to him for putting together a great panel and keeping us in line.
  • Everyone at SXSW had an iPhone.
  • Everyone communicated via Twitter.
  • Favorite quote: “The difference between unemployed and self-employed is only in your head.”
  • Favorite panel: How to Give Better Presentations – To unfairly summarize, be gimmicky to get people’s attention, play to their emotions, and don’t split their attention between what they see and what they hear.
  • I honestly cannot recommend this conference enough. Getting to be around the leaders in the technology field was an unbelievably energizing experience. I met some wonderful and inspiring people and I could feel the world changing over those five days.
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